Archive for the 'food' Category

07
Jan
12

Mixed Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin with Shallot-Port Reduction

A balance of deep flavor and sweetness that makes this dish perfect to go with your mashed potatoes or boiled rice!

Ingredients BEEF: 1 (2-pound) beef tenderloin, trimmed 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 tablespoons cracked mixed peppercorns Cooking spray

REDUCTION: 2 cups ruby port or other sweet red wine 1 1/2 cups fat-free, less-sodium beef broth 1/4 cup finely chopped shallots 1/8 teaspoon salt 2 sprigs fresh parsley 1 sprig fresh thyme 1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 3 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon butter 1/2 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

Steps 1Preheat oven to 450°. 2To prepare beef, sprinkle beef evenly with 1 teaspoon salt and peppercorns, pressing firmly to adhere. Place beef in a shallow roasting pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 450° for 33 minutes or until a thermometer registers 135° or until desired degree of doneness. Let stand 10 minutes before slicing.  3To prepare reduction, combine port and next 5 ingredients (through thyme) in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil. Cook until reduced to 1 1/4 cups (about 15 minutes). Strain port mixture through a sieve over a bowl; discard solids. Combine flour and 3 tablespoons water. Return port mixture to pan; add flour mixture to pan, stirring with a whisk. Bring to a boil; cook 1 minute or until thickened, stirring constantly with a whisk. Remove from heat; stir in butter and vinegar.

Advertisements
14
Dec
11

Tuscan Pork Loin

Roasted pork loin is a staple of Italian cooking. In this recipe we coat the lean meat with garlic, rosemary and aromatic lemon zest before it goes in the oven, and then deglaze the pan with vermouth to make a savory gravy. The roast is perfect for entertaining but equally at home for a Sunday family supper. About 10 servings

Active Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes (including 1 hour marinating time)

Ingredients 1 3-pound pork loin, trimmed 1 teaspoon kosher salt 3 cloves garlic, crushed and peeled 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon freshly grated lemon zest 3/4 cup dry vermouth, or white wine 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar.

Preparation 1.Tie kitchen string around pork in three places so it doesn’t flatten while roasting. Place salt and garlic in a small bowl and mash with the back of a spoon to form a paste. Stir in oil, rosemary and lemon zest; rub the mixture into the pork. Refrigerate, uncovered, for 1 hour. 2.Preheat oven to 375°F. 3.Place the pork in a roasting pan. Roast, turning once or twice, until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers 145°F, 40 to 50 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board; let rest for 10 minutes. 4.Meanwhile, add vermouth (or wine) and vinegar to the roasting pan and place over medium-high heat. Bring to a simmer and cook, scraping up any browned bits, until the sauce is reduced by half, 2 to 4 minutes. Remove the string and slice the roast. Add any accumulated juices to the sauce and serve with the pork.

Tips & Notes Make Ahead Tip: Equipment: Kitchen string

Nutrition

Per 3-ounce serving: 221 calories; 11 g fat ( 3 g sat , 6 g mono ); 69 mg cholesterol; 1 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 24 g protein; 0 g fiber; 156 mg sodium; 368 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Thiamin (58% daily value), Selenium (50% dv).

08
Dec
11

Baked salmon with Southeast Asian marinade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dietitian’s tip: Salmon works well on the grill. After you’ve wrapped the fish in aluminum foil, grill until firm and opaque throughout, about 10 minutes on each side. Serve on couscous with steamed green beans on the side.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Serves 2

Ingredients

1/2 cup pineapple juice 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 2 salmon fillets, each 4 ounces 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil Freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 cup diced fresh fruit, such as pineapple, mango and papaya

Directions

In a small bowl, add the pineapple juice, garlic, soy sauce and ginger. Stir to mix evenly.

Arrange the salmon fillets in a small baking dish. Pour the pineapple juice mixture over the top. Put in the refrigerator and marinate for 1 hour. Turn the salmon periodically as needed.

Preheat the oven to 375 F. Lightly coat 2 squares of aluminum foil with cooking spray. Place the marinated salmon fillets on the aluminum foil. Drizzle each with 1/8 teaspoon sesame oil. Sprinkle with pepper and top each with 1/2 cup diced fruit.

Wrap the foil around the salmon, folding the edges down to seal. Bake until the fish is opaque throughout when tested with the tip of a knife, about 10 minutes on each side. Transfer the salmon to warmed individual plates and serve immediately.

Nutritional Analysis

(per serving)

Serving size: 1 fillet
Calories 310 Cholesterol 67 mg
Protein 23 g Sodium 174 mg
Carbohydrate 24 g Fiber 1 g
Total fat 13 g Potassium 591 mg
Saturated fat 3 g Calcium 37 mg
Monounsaturated fat 4 g

Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid Servings

15
Aug
11

Healthy Eating Pyramid

Healthy Eating Pyramid

Use a food pyramid that’s actually based on the latest and best science.

1. Start with exercise. A healthy diet is built on a base of regular exercise, which keeps calories in balance and weight in check. Read five quick tips for staying active and getting to your healthy weight, and a dozen ideas for fitting exercise into your life.

2. Focus on food, not grams. The Healthy Eating Pyramid doesn’t worry about specific servings or grams of food, so neither should you. It’s a simple, general guide to how you should eat when you eat.

3. Go with plants. Eating a plant-based diet is healthiest. Choose plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and healthy fats, like olive and canola oil. Check out these delicious healthy recipes that bring the Healthy Eating Pyramid into your kitchen.

4. Cut way back on American staples. Red meat and processed meat, refined grains, potatoes, sugary drinks, and salty snacks are part of American culture, but they’re also really unhealthy. Go for a plant-based diet rich in non-starchy vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. And if you eat meat, fish and poultry are the best choices.

5. Take a multivitamin, and maybe have a drink. Taking a multivitamin can be a good nutrition insurance policy. Moderate drinking for many people can have real health benefits, but it’s not for everyone. Those who don’t drink shouldn’t feel that they need to start. Read about balancing alcohol’s risks and benefits.

Download the Healthy Eating Pyramid handout (PDF).

We can’t look at a pyramid these days without thinking of food and healthy eating. There was the U.S. government’s Food Guide Pyramid, followed by its replacement, My Pyramid, which was basically the same thing, just pitched on its side. The problem was that these efforts, while generally well intentioned, have been quite flawed at actually showing people what makes up a healthy diet. Why? Their recommendations have often been based on out-of-date science and influenced by people with business interests in their messages. The newly-unveiled MyPlate icon is an improvement, yet still doesn’t go far enough to show people how to make the healthiest choices.

But, there’s a better alternative: the Healthy Eating Pyramid, built by the faculty in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Read more about how to follow the Healthy Eating Pyramid.
Read about why the Dietary Guidelines for Americans is a step in the right direction, but does not go far enough.

Based on the latest science, and unaffected by businesses and organizations with a stake in its messages, the Healthy Eating Pyramid is a simple, trustworthy guide to choosing a healthy diet. Its foundation is daily exercise and weight control, since these two related elements strongly influence your chances of staying healthy. The Healthy Eating Pyramid builds from there, showing that you should eat more foods from the bottom part of the pyramid (vegetables, whole grains) and less from the top (red meat, refined grains, sugary drinks, and salt).

11
Apr
10

Mussels South of two borders

This is for you Jammer I hope you enjoy!!

 

 Mussels South of two borders

 

Ingredients

1/3 cup diced Spanish chorizo, (see Ingredient note)

1 medium onion, diced

1 small plum tomato, diced

2 tablespoons chopped canned green chiles, drained

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1 cup beer, preferably dark Mexican beer, such as Negra Modelo

2 pounds mussels, scrubbed and debearded if necessary (see Tip)

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Directions

1. Cook chorizo in a large saucepan over medium heat until beginning to brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Add onion; cook, stirring often, until softened, about 3 minutes. Stir in tomato, chiles, cumin and pepper; cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomato begins to break down, about 3 minutes. Pour in beer, increase heat to medium-high, and bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits.

2. Stir in mussels and return to a simmer. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook just until the mussels have opened, about 7 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in cilantro. (Discard any unopened mussels.) Serve the mussels with the sauce.

Tips:
Ingredient note: For this recipe we use fully cooked Spanish-style chorizo–spicy pork sausage seasoned with smoked paprika and chile–recognizable for its characteristic red color. Find it near other cured sausages in well-stocked supermarkets, specialty-food stores or online at tienda.com.

Tip: To clean mussels, scrub with a stiff brush under cold running water. Scrape off any barnacles using the shell of another mussel. Pull off the fuzzy “beard” from each one (some mussels may not have a beard).

Nutrition Facts

Calories 212, Total Fat 4 g, Saturated Fat 1 g, Cholesterol 24 mg, Sodium 439 mg, Carbohydrate 17 g, Fiber 3 g, Protein 18 g, Potassium 451 mg. Daily Values: Vitamin C 35%, Iron 25%. Exchanges: Vegetable 1,Lean Meat 2.
Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet


10
Apr
10

Maple Salmon with Greens, Edamame, and Walnuts

Maple Salmon with Greens, Edamame, and Walnuts

Makes: 4 servings

Ingredients
3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon finely chopped shallot
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons snipped fresh rosemary
4 5-ounce fresh or frozen skinless salmon fillets, about 1 inch thick
1 6-ounce package fresh baby spinach
1/2 cup cooked shelled edamame
1/2 cup red bell pepper strips
1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted

Directions
1. In a small saucepan, combine maple syrup, vinegar, lemon juice, mustard, shallot, salt, and pepper. For dressing, in a small bowl, stir together 2 tablespoons of the maple syrup mixture and the olive oil; set aside.
2. For glaze, heat the remaining maple syrup mixture to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, about 5 minutes, or until syrupy. Remove from heat; stir in rosemary.
3. Preheat broiler. Place fish on the greased, unheated rack of a broiler pan and brush with half the glaze. Broil 6 to 7 inches from heat for 5 minutes. Turn fish over; brush with remaining glaze. Broil for 3 to 5 minutes more, or until fish begins to flake when tested with a fork.
4. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine spinach, edamame, pepper strips, and nuts. Drizzle spinach mixture with dressing; toss to coat. Spoon salad onto plates; top with fish.

Nutrition facts per serving: 460 calories, 33g protein, 18g carbohydrate, 28g fat (5g saturated), 3g fiber

05
Mar
10

10 Healthest foods on the planet!

Lemons

 

These 10 superfoods are proven, expert-beloved disease fighters and energy boosters. Add them to your meals and get on the fast track to a super-healthy body.

Lemons

 

Why They’re Healthy:

— Just one lemon has more than 100 percent of your daily intake of vitamin C, which may help increase “good” HDL cholesterol levels and strengthen bones.

— Citrus flavonoids found in lemons may help inhibit the growth of cancer cells and act as an anti-inflammatory.

Quick Tip:

Add a slice of lemon to your green tea. One study found that citrus increases your body’s ability to absorb the antioxidants in the tea by about 80 percent.

Broccoli

Broccoli

Why It’s Healthy:

— One medium stalk of broccoli contains more than 100 percent of your daily vitamin K requirement and almost 200 percent of your recommended daily dose of vitamin C — two essential bone-building nutrients.

— The same serving also helps stave off numerous cancers.

Quick Tip:

Zap it! Preserve up to 90 percent of broccoli’s vitamin C by microwaving. (Steaming or boiling holds on to just 66 percent of the nutrient.)

Dark Chocolate

Dark Chocolate

Why It’s Healthy:

— Just one-fourth of an ounce daily can reduce blood pressure in otherwise healthy individuals.

— Cocoa powder is rich in flavonoids, antioxidants shown to reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol and increase “good” HDL levels.

Quick Tip:

A dark chocolate bar contains about 53.5 milligrams of flavonoids; a milk chocolate bar has fewer than 14.

Potato

Potatoes

Why They’re Healthy:

— One red potato contains 66 micrograms of cell-building folate — about the same amount found in one cup of spinach or broccoli.

— One sweet potato has almost eight times the amount of cancer-fighting and immune-boosting vitamin A you need daily.

Quick Tip:

Let your potato cool before eating. Research shows that doing so can help you burn close to 25 percent more fat after a meal, thanks to a fat-resistant starch.

Let your potato cool before eating. Research shows that doing so can help you burn close to 25 percent more fat after a meal, thanks to a fat-resistant starch.

Salmon

Salmon

Why It’s Healthy:

— A great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to a reduced risk of depression, heart disease, and cancer.

— A 3-ounce serving contains almost 50 percent of your daily dose of niacin, which may protect against Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss.

Quick Tip:

Opt for wild over farm-raised, which contains 16 times as much toxic polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) as wild salmon.

Walnut

Walnuts

Why They’re Healthy:

— Contain the most omega-3 fatty acids, which may help reduce cholesterol, of all nuts.

— Omega-3s have been shown to improve mood and fight cancer; they may protect against sun damage, too (but don’t skip the SPF!).

Quick Tip:

Eat a few for dessert: The antioxidant melatonin, found in walnuts, helps to regulate sleep.

Avocado

Avocados

Why They’re Healthy:

— Rich in healthy, satisfying fats proven in one study to lower cholesterol by about 22 percent.

— One has more than half the fiber and 40 percent of the folate you need daily, which may reduce your risk of heart disease.

Quick Tip:

Adding it to your salad can increase the absorption of key nutrients like beta-carotene by three to five times compared with salads without this superfood.

Garlic

Garlic

Why It’s Healthy:

— Garlic is a powerful disease fighter that can inhibit the growth of bacteria, including E. coli.

— Allicin, a compound found in garlic, works as a potent anti-inflammatory and has been shown to help lower cholesterol and blood-pressure levels.

Quick Tip:

Crushed fresh garlic releases the most allicin. Just don’t overcook; garlic exposed to high heat for more than 10 minutes loses important nutrients.

Spinach

Spinach

Why It’s Healthy:

— Spinach contains lutein and zeaxanthin, two immune-boosting antioxidants important for eye health.

— Recent research found that among cancer-fighting fruits and veggies, spinach is one of the most effective.

Quick Tip:

Spinach is a healthy — and flavorless — addition to any smoothie. You won’t taste it, we promise! Try blending 1 cup spinach, 1 cup grated carrots, 1 banana, 1 cup apple juice, and ice.

 
Dry-Roasted edamame

Beans

Why They’re Healthy:

— Eating a serving of legumes (beans, peas, and lentils) four times a week can lower your risk of heart disease by 22 percent.

— That same habit may also reduce your risk of breast cancer.

Quick Tip:

The darker the bean, the more antioxidants it contains. One study found that black bean hulls contain 40 times the amount of antioxidants found in white bean hulls.

 

 




Potential Clients

  • 33,490 hits

About Me

Me

What can I say about me? I am a caring, fun-loving person with goals of relieving my clients pain through the skilled touch of massage. My hope is that this blog will bring information to those who know nothing about massage and help them to make an educated decision about what modality of massage will benefit them the most. You will find healthy recipes, quick and easy work-outs, and the latest in meditation techniques to assist with relaxation. I hope you enjoy my site. Please leave a comment or suggestion, your input will be greatly appreciated.

Recent Post

October 2017
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Categories

Welcome Guests!

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 11 other followers